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GLOUCESTERSHIRE'S
JET AGE MUSEUM

We are open from 10am to 4pm on Saturdays, Sundays, the majority of UK Bank Holidays and selected Wednesdays during Schools’ holiday periods. 

Jet Age Museum is closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. 

Please check here to confirm opening dates.

FREE ENTRY ~ FREE PARKING ~ SUITABLE FOR ALL AGES

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Welcome to THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE AVIATION COLLeCTION at jet age museum

We celebrate Gloucestershire’s rich aviation heritage from the early days of flight, through the birth of the Jet Age to the present day.

Jet Age Museum is staffed only by volunteers, some of whom flew in aircraft we have on display. Come and visit, ask questions and learn about the history of aviation in Gloucestershire and beyond. We aim to preserve the past and inspire the future.

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Learn about our Exhibits

Jet Age Museum has a wide range of aircraft, engines and restoration projects on display.  

You can learn about our aircraft, projects and artefacts online, but there is no substitute for a visit, our knowledgeable volunteers are on hand throughout your tour to answer any questions you may have. 

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Visit our Open Cockpits

We offer timed guided tours of our Avro Vulcan bomber cockpit and our Hawker Siddeley Trident airliner. Please note that due to limited space and the steep access ladder, Vulcan tours are not suitable for small children, disabled guests or those with claustrophobia. The Trident is reached by a set of steps and may not be accessible to some disabled visitors.

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Support our work

The museum and our restoration work is run entirely by volunteers and financed by charitable donations.  

We need donations, parts for restoration and willing volunteers.

Think you could help?  We’d love to hear from you.

What's happening at Jet Age

Our next event at Jet Age Museum 

PIGS CAN FLY
By
HELEN LANDAU
performed as a radio play

Tells the story of the early flying pioneers led by Charles Rolls and the engineering exploits of the Short Brothers and their battle to gain recognition not only from the Government, but the public and the press. It also describes the tragic love affair between Charles Rolls and Vera Hedges Butler blighted by the strict class divisions of the period.
An outrageous stunt by Frank McClean finally convinced the Government that Pigs Can Fly.

Fancy a Flutter and Help Us

Buy a ticket for £1

Nominate us as your chosen charity